Springsteen upset as beloved E Street Band member left off new album cover – NJ.com

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As Bruce Springsteen appeared on “The Late Show with Stephen Colbert” Monday night, The Boss was quick to point out a mistake on his new album cover, a live recording of his 1979 “No Nukes Concerts” charity shows at Madison Square Garden.

“There’s one problem with this album cover,” said Springsteen, showing a vinyl cover that depicts him and E Street Band-mates Clarence Clemons (saxophone), Steven Van Zandt (guitar), Danny Federici (organ), Garry Tallent (bass) and Max Weinberg (drums) performing on stage. “Every band member is on it except for (pianist) Roy Bittan. Roy Bittan is not on this album cover by mistake. And I am in very deep s*** about it, which is why I bring it up this evening.” The live audience laughed.

“So Roy, you are not here, but you are here in my heart,” Springsteen continued.

“Professor” Roy Bittan, a Queens native, joined the E Street Band during the recording of “Born to Run” in 1975 and has remained a powerful and calming presence in the band ever since.

Springsteen was on “Colbert” to promote both the live album and its accompanying concert film, set for a Nov. 19 release. The audio will be released on vinyl and CD, and the film on DVD, blu-Ray and digital download.

Springsteen no nukes

Bruce Springsteen’s “The Legendary No 1979 Nukes Concerts” album cover omits Roy Bittan.

Springsteen was also on hand to promote his new collaborative book with former President Barack Obama, “Renegades: Born in the U.S.A.,” which accompanies the duo’s eight-part podcast released earlier this year. The book is out Tuesday.

Bruce also brought along his iconic “Born to Run” album cover guitar, purchased in Belmar about 50 years ago, which Springsteen said “has been in every club, theater, arena and stadium in America and the world.” And no, he doesn’t really play it on stage anyway.

Springsteen finished off his night on “Colbert” with a haunting and intimate solo rendition of “The River,” which he wrote in 1979, around the time of the “No Nukes” shows, while he was living on a farm in Holmdel.

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Bobby Olivier may be reached at bolivier@njadvancemedia.com. Follow him on Twitter @BobbyOlivier and Facebook. Find NJ.com on Facebook.

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