Queen marks Prince Philips 100th birthday by planting a Duke of Edinburgh rose – Daily Mail

Uncategorized
Spread the love

Gazing down from her apartments at Windsor Castle, the Queen will see a touching memorial to her late husband on what would have been his 100th birthday.

A beautiful ‘Duke of Edinburgh‘ rose has been planted in the East Terrace Garden below her private rooms.

The monarch received the shrub last week from the aptly-named Keith Weed, president of the Royal Horticultural Society. It now grows in a mixed rose border in gardens that Prince Philip helped to design.

Her Majesty described the Duke of Edinburgh Rose, which is deep pink, dappled with white lines and double-flowered, as ‘lovely’ and the tribute as ‘very kind’. 

The Queen (pictured receiving the rose) has marked what would have been her beloved husband Prince Philip's 100th birthday on Thursday with a touching memorial at Windsor Castle

The Queen (pictured receiving the rose) has marked what would have been her beloved husband Prince Philip's 100th birthday on Thursday with a touching memorial at Windsor Castle

The Queen (pictured receiving the rose) has marked what would have been her beloved husband Prince Philip’s 100th birthday on Thursday with a touching memorial at Windsor Castle

When she looks out of the window of her private apartments, the 95-year-old monarch will now see a beautiful 'Duke of Edinburgh' rose, planted in the East Terrace Garden (pictured)

When she looks out of the window of her private apartments, the 95-year-old monarch will now see a beautiful 'Duke of Edinburgh' rose, planted in the East Terrace Garden (pictured)

When she looks out of the window of her private apartments, the 95-year-old monarch will now see a beautiful ‘Duke of Edinburgh’ rose, planted in the East Terrace Garden (pictured)

The Queen (pictured) was presented with the shrub on Wednesday last week by the Keith Weed, president of the Royal Horticultural Society, of which she is patron

The Queen (pictured) was presented with the shrub on Wednesday last week by the Keith Weed, president of the Royal Horticultural Society, of which she is patron

A Duke of Edinburgh rose, pictured

A Duke of Edinburgh rose, pictured

The Queen (pictured left) was presented with the shrub (pictured right) on Wednesday last week by Keith Weed, president of the Royal Horticultural Society, of which she is patron

Prince Philip restructured the Windsor flowerbeds and commissioned a bronze lotus fountain which features at the centre of the plot.

The deep pink rose was created by Harkness Roses and officially named in memory of the Queen’s husband of 73 years, who died on April 9.

Dressed in a pretty blue floral dress and pearls, topped off with a casual cream cardigan, the 95-year-old Queen looked in good spirits when she met Mr Weed. 

She wore sunglasses and smiled broadly when she saw the gift, which has an image of her late husband on the label.

A year ago, the monarch and Philip were photographed together in the castle’s quadrangle to mark the duke’s 99th birthday, but he died just nine weeks before he was due to turn 100.

The rose (pictured being gifted to the Queen) was later planted in a mixed rose border at Windsor Castle

The rose (pictured being gifted to the Queen) was later planted in a mixed rose border at Windsor Castle

The rose (pictured being gifted to the Queen) was later planted in a mixed rose border at Windsor Castle

The newly-bred, deep pink strain of rose was created by Harkness Roses and officially named in memory of the Queen's husband of 73 years, who died on April 9. Pictured, the Queen in her garden

The newly-bred, deep pink strain of rose was created by Harkness Roses and officially named in memory of the Queen's husband of 73 years, who died on April 9. Pictured, the Queen in her garden

The newly-bred, deep pink strain of rose was created by Harkness Roses and officially named in memory of the Queen’s husband of 73 years, who died on April 9. Pictured, the Queen in her garden

Dressed in a pretty blue floral dress and pearls, topped off with a casual cream cardigan, the Queen (pictured) looked in good spirits

Dressed in a pretty blue floral dress and pearls, topped off with a casual cream cardigan, the Queen (pictured) looked in good spirits

Dressed in a pretty blue floral dress and pearls, topped off with a casual cream cardigan, the Queen (pictured) looked in good spirits

Mr Weed told the Queen: ‘It’s a rose named the Duke of Edinburgh Rose to mark his centenary and it’s a commemorative rose for all the marvellous things that he did over his lifetime and for everyone to remember so much that he did.

‘Each rose, there’s a donation that goes to the Living Legacy Fund which will help more children. It’s a beautiful flower in itself, a double flower,’ to which the Queen replied: ‘It looks lovely’.

Mr Weed added of the rose: ‘Right now, with a cold spring and nature being a little bit behind, it doesn’t look so lovely there but that’s what it looks like. The picture says it all,’ to which the Queen remarked: ‘Well that’s very kind.’ 

The Queen (pictured) wore sunglasses in the blazing sunshine and smiled broadly when she saw the gift, which has a photograph of her late husband on the label

The Queen (pictured) wore sunglasses in the blazing sunshine and smiled broadly when she saw the gift, which has a photograph of her late husband on the label

The Queen (pictured) wore sunglasses in the blazing sunshine and smiled broadly when she saw the gift, which has a photograph of her late husband on the label

The Queen receives a Duke of Edinburgh rose, given to her by Keith Weed, President of the Royal Horticultural Society

The Queen receives a Duke of Edinburgh rose, given to her by Keith Weed, President of the Royal Horticultural Society

The Queen receives a Duke of Edinburgh rose, given to her by Keith Weed, President of the Royal Horticultural Society

A royalty from the sale of each rose (pictured being given to the Queen) will go to the Duke of Edinburgh's Award Living Legacy Fund, which will give more young people the opportunity to take part in the Duke of Edinburgh Award

A royalty from the sale of each rose (pictured being given to the Queen) will go to the Duke of Edinburgh's Award Living Legacy Fund, which will give more young people the opportunity to take part in the Duke of Edinburgh Award

A royalty from the sale of each rose (pictured being given to the Queen) will go to the Duke of Edinburgh’s Award Living Legacy Fund, which will give more young people the opportunity to take part in the Duke of Edinburgh Award

The Queen walks with RHS President Keith Weed (centre) towards a border in the gardens of Windsor Castle, in Berkshire, to watch the planting of the Duke of Edinburgh rose, given to her by the Royal Horticultural Society

The Queen walks with RHS President Keith Weed (centre) towards a border in the gardens of Windsor Castle, in Berkshire, to watch the planting of the Duke of Edinburgh rose, given to her by the Royal Horticultural Society

The Queen walks with RHS President Keith Weed (centre) towards a border in the gardens of Windsor Castle, in Berkshire, to watch the planting of the Duke of Edinburgh rose, given to her by the Royal Horticultural Society

The monarch watched as the tiny shrub bush – which will grow to around 70cm tall – was rehomed by Windsor’s head gardener Philip Carter in the grounds as a permanent reminder of the duke.

The Queen remarked on seeing there was a ‘hole already’ made for the rose, and chuckled in agreement when told Mr Carter had done a lovely job with the borders.

She also commented on how the blooms were not fully out because of the cold weather in May. ‘As you can see, nothing has flowered here much,’ she said.

The RHS president replied: ‘I’ll tell you what, your roses are a little ahead of mine. But they really by now would normally be over.’

The Duke of Edinburgh's Award scheme became one of Philip's most remarkable achievements. Pictured, the Queen in her garden

The Duke of Edinburgh's Award scheme became one of Philip's most remarkable achievements. Pictured, the Queen in her garden

The Duke of Edinburgh’s Award scheme became one of Philip’s most remarkable achievements. Pictured, the Queen in her garden

Philip, an inspirational and committed champion of young people, established the awards 65 years ago. Pictured, the Queen walking around the Windsor Castle grounds

Philip, an inspirational and committed champion of young people, established the awards 65 years ago. Pictured, the Queen walking around the Windsor Castle grounds

Philip, an inspirational and committed champion of young people, established the awards 65 years ago. Pictured, the Queen walking around the Windsor Castle grounds

Philip was also a committed conservationist who took a deep personal interest in the management and running of all the royal estates. Pictured, the Queen and her guest Keith Weed

Philip was also a committed conservationist who took a deep personal interest in the management and running of all the royal estates. Pictured, the Queen and her guest Keith Weed

Philip was also a committed conservationist who took a deep personal interest in the management and running of all the royal estates. Pictured, the Queen and her guest Keith Weed

For every rose sold (pictured being presented to the monarch), Harkness Roses will donate £2.50 to the Duke of Edinburgh's Award Living Legacy Fund

For every rose sold (pictured being presented to the monarch), Harkness Roses will donate £2.50 to the Duke of Edinburgh's Award Living Legacy Fund

For every rose sold (pictured being presented to the monarch), Harkness Roses will donate £2.50 to the Duke of Edinburgh’s Award Living Legacy Fund

But the Queen responded: ‘No, no, no, it’s Ascot Week,’ with Mr Carter confirming the monarch had correctly identified when her roses usually bloom and how long they last.

Her Majesty added: ‘We had a very cold May, didn’t we?’, before Mr Weed told her: ‘If we can say any good things about this extraordinary year, we’ve had a boom in gardening.’ The monarch replied: ‘It’s rather nice, isn’t it.’

Told there are now 30 million gardeners in the UK – a jump of 10 per cent – the Queen added: ‘That’s very good.’

A keen conservationist, the Duke took a deep interest in the management of the royal estates.

Describing their meeting, Mr Weed said: ‘Whilst being very poignant, it was also a delight to give Her Majesty the Queen, patron of the Royal Horticultural Society, the Duke of Edinburgh rose to mark what would have been HRH the Duke of Edinburgh’s 100th birthday and to remember his remarkable life.

Earlier today, rehearsals took place for Her Majesty's birthday celebration, Trooping the Colour, at Windsor Castle (pictured)

Earlier today, rehearsals took place for Her Majesty's birthday celebration, Trooping the Colour, at Windsor Castle (pictured)

Earlier today, rehearsals took place for Her Majesty’s birthday celebration, Trooping the Colour, at Windsor Castle (pictured)

The event has been scaled back due to the pandemic and will be held at Windsor castle on Saturday. Usually, the occasion is held at Buckingham Palace. Pictured, the rehearsals

The event has been scaled back due to the pandemic and will be held at Windsor castle on Saturday. Usually, the occasion is held at Buckingham Palace. Pictured, the rehearsals

The event has been scaled back due to the pandemic and will be held at Windsor castle on Saturday. Usually, the occasion is held at Buckingham Palace. Pictured, the rehearsals

‘The Duke’s devotion to raising public awareness of the importance of conserving the natural world leaves a lasting legacy.’

Harkness Roses, breeders and growers of roses for more than 140 years, describe their new medium-sized shrub as a ‘truly amazing variety of deep-pink colour dappled with white lines’. 

It has ‘attractive, double flowers’ gathered in large clusters on long stems, with healthy leaves, and are said to be perfect as vase flowers or beds because of their ‘delicate fragrance’.

Managing director Philip Harkness said: ‘We are thrilled to introduce this brand-new commemorative rose to remember the remarkable life of The Duke of Edinburgh.’ 

The Kings's Troop Royal Horse Artillery and the Household Cavalry Mounted Regiment ride along the Long Walk today

The Kings's Troop Royal Horse Artillery and the Household Cavalry Mounted Regiment ride along the Long Walk today

The Kings’s Troop Royal Horse Artillery and the Household Cavalry Mounted Regiment ride along the Long Walk today

The small ceremony will begin at 11am on Saturday and is expected to last a couple of hours. Pictured, the full rehearsal taking place today

The small ceremony will begin at 11am on Saturday and is expected to last a couple of hours. Pictured, the full rehearsal taking place today

The small ceremony will begin at 11am on Saturday and is expected to last a couple of hours. Pictured, the full rehearsal taking place today

The plant is available to buy online now. For every one sold, Harkness Roses will donate £2.50 to the prince’s Award Living Legacy Fund, which helps young people take part in the long-running Duke of Edinburgh Award scheme.

‘Not only is this rose spectacular to look at, but you will also be raising funds for a very worthy cause,’ said Mr Harkness.

Philip, an inspirational and committed champion of young people, established the awards 65 years ago.

The Duke of Edinburgh’s Award scheme became one of his most remarkable achievements, helping young people build life-long belief in themselves, supporting them to take on their own challenges, follow their own passions, and discover talents they never knew they had.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *